Dunster House Ltd.
Incorporated. 1994
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What tools do I need to assemble my climbing frame?

To assemble your Dunster House climbing frame, you’ll need to buy, own, beg, borrow or steal (please note, don’t steal) the following good quality DIY hand tools.


SCREWDRIVER - A good quality electric screwdriver is best. We are fanatical about safety and you could say our climbing frames are almost over engineered from a safety point of view. This means lots of screws. It will save you a lot of time using an electric screwdriver rather than a hand screwdriver
HAMMER - Timber is a natural product that expands and contracts, especially the timber we use for our climbing frames as it is pressure treated. This means the predrilled holes for the bolts may have got smaller. We would recommend redrilling holes in this situation but you may find you want to gently “persuade” a few bolts through.
DRILL - Large holes for bolts are predrilled but some of the smaller screw holes are not. It is best practice to pre-drill so that timber doesn’t split. Luckily, if you have a good quality electric screwdriver (see above), it can also be used as an electric drill.
SOCKET SET A lot of the major joints are bolted together on our climbing frames, not just screwed, for extra strength. Only down side is the extra tools you will need – a socket set. You will need a 10mm socket for all of our climbing frames and a 8mm socket for all our climbing frames with monkey bars but you may need others for other configurations and optional extras so best to get your hands on a set.
ADJUSTABLE SPANNER We use wrap around swing hooks that brace the timber rather than bolt through swing hooks that pass through the swing beam and risk weakening it. You’ll need an adjustable spanner to tighten these.
LEVEL To check that your Play System is level when you assemble it.
SPADE - We use large ground anchors with a large disc at the end of each to properly anchor down your climbing frame. Unless you have loose soil that these can just screw in to, you will need to dig down a few holes for these. It might seem like more work but it is worth it when your climbing frame is nice and secure and safe for your little ones. The harder it is for a ground anchor to go in, the more force it will take to pull it out. Some companies use plastic pegs as ground anchors. Very easy to drive in to the ground but if it goes in that easily, it will come out that easily too!